Interviewer vs. Interviewer

Interviewer vs. Interviewer
( Click on picture to view) Elizabeth Lund--Host of Poetic Lines interviews Host of Poet to Poet-- Doug Holder

Saturday, June 15, 2019

June 18, 2019 5PM Gregory Wolos: Author of Women of Consequences

Gregory Wolos
    SEE IT LIVE AT 5PM         http://somervillemedia.org


Gregory Wolos lives, writes, and runs in a small New England town. More than seventy of Gregory’s short stories have been published or are forthcoming in print and online journals such as Glimmer TrainThe Georgia ReviewThe Florida Review, The Baltimore ReviewThe PinchPost RoadThe Los Angeles ReviewPANK, and Tahoma Literary Review. His work has earned six Pushcart Prize nominations and his stories have won awards sponsored by SolsticeGulf StreamNew South, and the Rubery Book Awards. His fiction collection Women of Consequence was released by Regal House Publishing in 2019. Gregory holds a doctorate from the University at Albany. More often than not, his writing reflects Kafka’s assertion that a literary work “must be an ice ax to break the sea frozen inside us.”

Tuesday, May 28, 2019

June 4, 2019 5PM Luke Salisbury author of " No Common War"

Luke Salisbury

view it live at  5PM  June 4 at  http://somervillemedia.org 



No Common War is a fictionalized history of the author's family's participation in the abolition movement and the Civil War. The names of key persons and places are real. The Union soldier on the book's jacket is Moreau Salisbury.
In 1835 two Salisbury brothers accompany the Great Cheese, a 1,800-pound monstrosity created by the leading citizens of Sandy Creek, New York, to Washington City to promote the town and celebrate New York State. In the nation's capitol, they witness the whipping of a slave on Christmas Day. Mason Salisbury demands to know if the slaver is a Christian, and is struck across the face with the whip. Worse would have happened but for Mason's brother Lorenzo's striking the slaver with the butt of his shotgun.
Mason becomes an implacable abolitionist, frequently speaking for the cause and showing his scar. He helps escaped slaves reach Canada. in 1861 his son, Moreau, is at seminary at Cazenovia when Ft. Sumter is fired on. Moreau returns home, telling his father he cannot reconcile "Thou shalt not kill" with killing, even against the abomination of slavery. Moreau's mind is changed when he discovers an escaped slave trying to get to Lake Ontario (four miles from Sandy Creek) and his family shelters the man until he can be transported to Canada. Moreau does not know that Mason, his father, has manipulated his discovery.
Afterward, Moreau and his cousin Merrick (Lorenzo's son) join the 24th New York Volunteers, but not before Moreau falls in love with Helen, a local girl.
The 24th is billeted outside Washington, held in reserve when the Union and Confederate armies meet at Bull Run, but witness fleeing Union soldiers and disillusioned civilians who went to see a spectacle but discovered war. During the winter the 24th bivouac on the grounds of Robert E. Lee's Arlington, Virginia plantation and venture into Washington for drinking and womanizing.
The summer of 1862 is a succession of battles. The 24th meets rebels for the first time at Cedar Mountain. Moreau and Merrick see men killed, smell powder and blood, hear the screams of the wounded. They stand abreast and fire at Confederate soldiers also standing abreast and firing at them.
The 24th fights at Groveton, is part of the disastrous charge at the sunken railroad at Second Bull run, fights its way up South Mountain under heavy fire, and then Antietam. The 24th is in the third wave through the cornfield at Antietam.
Antietam remains the bloodiest single day in American history. There are almost 22,000 casualties. The cornfield will be crossed and recrossed fifteen times, and when the battle is over a person could walk across it without touching the ground for the bodies.
Moreau is shot through the ankle. Merrick receives a Minie ball in the knee. Word of their wounds reaches Sandy Creek. Moreau's and Merrick's fathers go to the battlefield, arriving the day after the end of the battle. They find their sons in among the four acres of wounded. Surgeons are amputating limbs, men are crying out in pain, blood pools under the boards and tables used for surgery. The two fathers talk a surgeon out of amputating their sons' legs.
Moreau barely survives the trip home. Merrick dies along the way.
At home, Moreau becomes increasingly depressed, angry, distant from his parents, cruel to Helen who has waited faithfully for his return. He becomes addicted to morphine. He considers suicide. There are terrible arguments with Helen, the grief of Moreau's mother whose love cannot reach her son, anger at Mason for supporting the war, and finally a violent father-son confrontation. The family is desperate.  Mason tries to find the freed slave, to remind Moreau what he had fought for, but cannot locate him. It is a long, brutal winter.
But spring will come, and with it love and trust. The price has been high.

Tuesday, May 14, 2019

Poet Ravi Teja Yelamanchili May 21, 2019 5PM

see it live at  http://somervillemedia.org

                                    Ravi Teja Yelamanchili 

Ravi Teja Yelamanchili is currently working at Vision33 as a Technical Business Analyst. His writing has previously been published in the Muddy River Poetry Review, the Somerville Times, Sahitya Akademis Indian Literature, Muse India, and several other journals. He also won the Boston Mayors Poetry Program Contest, and the University of Pittsburgh Undergraduate Poetry Contest.

Saturday, May 04, 2019

My guest May 14 5PM Aaron Tillman, author of "Every Single Bone in My Brain"Aaron Tillman

Aaron Tillman

Aaron Tillman is a fiction writer and Pushcart Prize nominee for 2019 and 2018. He is Associate Professor of English at Newbury College and Director of Newbury's Honors Program. His short story collection, Every Single Bone in My Brain, was published by Braddock Avenue Books in July of 2017, and his book of critical nonfiction, Magical American Jew: The Enigma of Difference in Contemporary Jewish American Short Fiction and Film, was published by Lexington Books in November 2017. Aaron received the John Gardner Memorial Prize in Fiction from Harpur Palate and a Short Story Award for New Writers from Glimmer Train Stories; he won First Prize in the Nancy Potter Short Story Contest at University of Rhode Island, and his novel was a finalist in the 2016 Molly Ivors Prize for Fiction. His stories have appeared in Mississippi Review, Glimmer Train Stories, Harpur Palate, Sou'Wester, upstreet, The Tishman Review, The Madison Review, Arcadia Magazine, The Carolina Quarterly, great weather for MEDIA, Prick of the Spindle, Burrow Press Review, and elsewhere. He has recorded two stories for broadcast on the Words & Music program at Tufts University and another for Functionally Literate Radio. His essays have appeared in The Writer's Chronicle, Studies in American Humor, Symbolism, The CEA Critic, and The Intersection of Fantasy and Native America (Mythopoeic 2009).

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

April 2, 2019 Dan Lynn Watt author of "History Lessons: A Memoir of Growing Up in an American Communist Family








History Lessons traces Dan Lynn Watt's journey through childhood in New York during the McCarthy era. He marched on May Day with his war hero father and activist mother, chanting "We don't want another war!" and "Jim Crow must go!" At camp, he sang about world peace, freedom, and workers' rights. At school, he attempted to hide his family's politics. He takes you inside family struggles against racism and political repression. Disillusioned with communism by the 1960s, he became a civil rights and antiwar activist.

Thursday, March 21, 2019

Curious Peach 











“What wond’rous Life in this I lead!
Ripe Apples drop about my head;
The Luscious Clusters of the Vine
Upon my Mouth do crush their Wine;
The Nectaren, and curious Peach,
Into my hands themselves do reach;
Stumbling on Melons, as I pass,
Insnar’d with Flow’rs, I fall on Grass”



---Andrew Marvell, The Garden

March 26, 2019 5P.M. Brian Coleman, author of "Buy Me, Boston."



  watch it live at 5PM http://www.somervillemedia.org



Take a trip to the Boston of yesteryear, guided by advertisements for the businesses and characters that made the city tick in the 1960s, ‘70s and ‘80s – restaurants, hair salons, bands, bars, clothing boutiques and more.


Buy Me, Boston features over 375 vintage advertisements, posters and flyers. These images have been scanned from original sources, including issues of The Boston Phoenix, The Real Paper, The Bay State Banner, Boston After Dark, Boston Rock and many more, straight from the stockpiles of renowned archivists and historians like David Bieber, Kay Bourne, Chuck White and Wayne Valdez.


Compiled and curated by journalist Brian Coleman, Buy Me, Boston is a unique, time-traveling journey back to a city that exists only in the fond memories of longtime denizens. Whether you patronized these establishments and happenings the first time around, or just want to know more about our unique town and the people whose energy and creativity fuels it, this book guarantees smiles with the turn of every new page.


PRAISE FOR "BUY ME, BOSTON":  

“A snapshot of a particular time and place when the city bristled with an alt-weekly energy, an underground thrust, and a whole lot of questionable hairstyles. Coleman has created a treasure chest of Boston memorabilia, reminding longtime dwellers of things we didn’t even know we missed.”
– Boston Globe (Nina MacLaughlin)


“A romp through this city’s dirty-water years… it’s an experience meant to be shared.”
– Boston Magazine (Shaula Clark)


“This is about the best history book you will find about our culture. It’s all true, I was there!”
– Willie “Loco” Alexander


“A time capsule, showing what independent papers in the Boston area looked like from the 1960s through the ‘80s.”
– Sue O’Connell, NECN