Interviewer vs. Interviewer

Interviewer vs. Interviewer
( Click on picture to view) Elizabeth Lund--Host of Poetic Lines interviews Host of Poet to Poet-- Doug Holder

Friday, July 12, 2019

Interview with Victor Wallis author of the Red/Green Revolution

VICTOR WALLIS


Red-Green Revolution is an impassioned and informed confrontation with the planetary emergency brought about by accelerated ecological devastation in the last half-century.

Its author, distinguished political scientist Victor Wallis, argues that sound ecological policy requires a socialist framework, based on democratic participation and drawing on the historical lessons of earlier efforts.

Wallis presents a relentless critique of the capitalist system that has put the human species into a race against time to salvage and restore what it can of the environmental conditions necessary for a healthy existence. He then looks to how we might turn things around, reconsidering the institutions, technologies, and social relationships that will determine our shared future, and discussing how a better framework can evolve through the convergence of popular struggles, as these have emerged under conditions of crisis.

This is an important book, both for its incisive account of how we got into the mess in which we find ourselves, and for its bold vision of how we might still go forward.

Wednesday, July 03, 2019

July 9, 5PM Doug Holder Interviews DeWitt Henry

see It Live at 5PM  at  http://somervillemedia.org

BIOGRAPHY

Born 6/30/41 in Wayne, PA. Radnor High School, 1959; A.B. Amherst College, 1963; M.A. in English, Harvard Univ., 1965; Ph.D. English, Harvard Univ., 1971; completed requirements for M.F.A. University of Iowa, 1968 (did not take the degree). Married Constance Sherbill 1973; two children Ruth Kathryn Henry born 1977; David Jung Min Henry born 1985. Grandaughters Eva Luz Henry born 2003, Maya Salome Torres-Henry born 2009. Sister Judy Friedericy; brothers Charles (deceased 1999) and John T. Henry (deceased 2004). Founding editor of Ploughshares literary magazine, and active editor and director 1971-1995. Interim Director of Ploughshares 6/2007-10/2008. Professor Emeritus , Emerson College, 2016-present. Professor, Writing, Literature, and Publishing, Emerson College, 2006-2015; Associate Professor 1989 to 2006: hired as Assistant Professor 1983; Acting Chairperson 1987-8; Chairperson 1989-93. Contributing editor to Solstice: A Magazine of Diverse Voices (2013-) and to The Woven Tale Press: Arts and Literary Journal (2016-).

MY WRITING, EDITING AND PUBLISHING LIFE

SWEET MARJORAM: NOTES AND ESSAYS, Plume Editions / Mad Hat Press, 2018.

FALLING: SIX STORIES, CreateSpace, 2016

VISIONS OF A WAYNE CHILDHOOD, CreateSpace, 2012

SWEET DREAMS: A FAMILY HISTORY, Hidden River Press, 2011

SAFE SUICIDE: ESSAYS, NARRATIVES, AND MEDITATIONS, Red Hen Press, 2008

Novel:THE MARRIAGE OF ANNA MAYE POTTS, University of Tennesee Press, 2001 (winner of the Peter Taylor Prize for the Novel)

Anthologies Edited:

SORROW'S COMPANY: WRITERS ON LOSS AND GRIEF, Beacon Press, 2001

BREAKING INTO PRINT: EARLY STORIES AND INSIGHTS INTO GETTING PUBLISHED; A PLOUGHSHARES ANTHOLOGY, Beacon Press, 2000

FATHERING DAUGHTERS: REFLECTIONS BY MEN (with James Alan McPherson), Beacon Press 1998, pb. 1999

OTHER SIDES OF SILENCE: NEW FICTION FROM PLOUGHSHARES, Faber and Faber, 1993, o.p.

THE PLOUGHSHARES READER: NEW FICTION FOR THE 80S, Pushcart Press, 1984, NAL, 1985; winner Third Annual Editors Book Award

Wednesday, June 26, 2019

July 2 5PM Doug Holder interviews Phil Temples author of " Machine Feelings"


Phil Temples was born and raised in Bloomington, Indiana, but he’s lived and played in greater Boston, Massachusetts for nearly four decades.
Phil Temples began writing flash fiction and short stories in the 1990s for his own amusement. He’s had over 140 titles appear online and in print. His first novel, The Winship Affair, was published in 2014 by Blue Mustang Press.  In 2017, Big Table Publishing Company accepted two additional works for publication: a short story anthology, Machine Feelings, and the paranormal horror-mystery, Helltown Chronicles.  Phil’s first novella, Albey Damned, was published by Wapshott Press in late 2017.  The second in the Carrie Bloomfield Novel seriesThe Allston Variant, is now available from Moonshine Cove Publishing. His third Carrie Bloomfield installment, Uncontacted Frontier, is currently a work in progress.
Phil Temples’ professional career spans the fields of software engineering and computer systems administration in the .com, .org, and .edu sectors. For the past 16 years, he’s worked as a computer systems administrator at a Boston-area university.
In addition to his day job and writing activities, Phil is a ham radio aficionado, and a singer in a garage band.

Saturday, June 15, 2019

June 18, 2019 5PM Gregory Wolos: Author of Women of Consequences

Gregory Wolos
    SEE IT LIVE AT 5PM         http://somervillemedia.org


Gregory Wolos lives, writes, and runs in a small New England town. More than seventy of Gregory’s short stories have been published or are forthcoming in print and online journals such as Glimmer TrainThe Georgia ReviewThe Florida Review, The Baltimore ReviewThe PinchPost RoadThe Los Angeles ReviewPANK, and Tahoma Literary Review. His work has earned six Pushcart Prize nominations and his stories have won awards sponsored by SolsticeGulf StreamNew South, and the Rubery Book Awards. His fiction collection Women of Consequence was released by Regal House Publishing in 2019. Gregory holds a doctorate from the University at Albany. More often than not, his writing reflects Kafka’s assertion that a literary work “must be an ice ax to break the sea frozen inside us.”

Tuesday, May 28, 2019

June 4, 2019 5PM Luke Salisbury author of " No Common War"

Luke Salisbury

view it live at  5PM  June 4 at  http://somervillemedia.org 



No Common War is a fictionalized history of the author's family's participation in the abolition movement and the Civil War. The names of key persons and places are real. The Union soldier on the book's jacket is Moreau Salisbury.
In 1835 two Salisbury brothers accompany the Great Cheese, a 1,800-pound monstrosity created by the leading citizens of Sandy Creek, New York, to Washington City to promote the town and celebrate New York State. In the nation's capitol, they witness the whipping of a slave on Christmas Day. Mason Salisbury demands to know if the slaver is a Christian, and is struck across the face with the whip. Worse would have happened but for Mason's brother Lorenzo's striking the slaver with the butt of his shotgun.
Mason becomes an implacable abolitionist, frequently speaking for the cause and showing his scar. He helps escaped slaves reach Canada. in 1861 his son, Moreau, is at seminary at Cazenovia when Ft. Sumter is fired on. Moreau returns home, telling his father he cannot reconcile "Thou shalt not kill" with killing, even against the abomination of slavery. Moreau's mind is changed when he discovers an escaped slave trying to get to Lake Ontario (four miles from Sandy Creek) and his family shelters the man until he can be transported to Canada. Moreau does not know that Mason, his father, has manipulated his discovery.
Afterward, Moreau and his cousin Merrick (Lorenzo's son) join the 24th New York Volunteers, but not before Moreau falls in love with Helen, a local girl.
The 24th is billeted outside Washington, held in reserve when the Union and Confederate armies meet at Bull Run, but witness fleeing Union soldiers and disillusioned civilians who went to see a spectacle but discovered war. During the winter the 24th bivouac on the grounds of Robert E. Lee's Arlington, Virginia plantation and venture into Washington for drinking and womanizing.
The summer of 1862 is a succession of battles. The 24th meets rebels for the first time at Cedar Mountain. Moreau and Merrick see men killed, smell powder and blood, hear the screams of the wounded. They stand abreast and fire at Confederate soldiers also standing abreast and firing at them.
The 24th fights at Groveton, is part of the disastrous charge at the sunken railroad at Second Bull run, fights its way up South Mountain under heavy fire, and then Antietam. The 24th is in the third wave through the cornfield at Antietam.
Antietam remains the bloodiest single day in American history. There are almost 22,000 casualties. The cornfield will be crossed and recrossed fifteen times, and when the battle is over a person could walk across it without touching the ground for the bodies.
Moreau is shot through the ankle. Merrick receives a Minie ball in the knee. Word of their wounds reaches Sandy Creek. Moreau's and Merrick's fathers go to the battlefield, arriving the day after the end of the battle. They find their sons in among the four acres of wounded. Surgeons are amputating limbs, men are crying out in pain, blood pools under the boards and tables used for surgery. The two fathers talk a surgeon out of amputating their sons' legs.
Moreau barely survives the trip home. Merrick dies along the way.
At home, Moreau becomes increasingly depressed, angry, distant from his parents, cruel to Helen who has waited faithfully for his return. He becomes addicted to morphine. He considers suicide. There are terrible arguments with Helen, the grief of Moreau's mother whose love cannot reach her son, anger at Mason for supporting the war, and finally a violent father-son confrontation. The family is desperate.  Mason tries to find the freed slave, to remind Moreau what he had fought for, but cannot locate him. It is a long, brutal winter.
But spring will come, and with it love and trust. The price has been high.

Tuesday, May 14, 2019

Poet Ravi Teja Yelamanchili May 21, 2019 5PM

see it live at  http://somervillemedia.org

                                    Ravi Teja Yelamanchili 

Ravi Teja Yelamanchili is currently working at Vision33 as a Technical Business Analyst. His writing has previously been published in the Muddy River Poetry Review, the Somerville Times, Sahitya Akademis Indian Literature, Muse India, and several other journals. He also won the Boston Mayors Poetry Program Contest, and the University of Pittsburgh Undergraduate Poetry Contest.